10 Classic Books You Read in High School You Should Reread

By Kevin Smokler

It’s all too easy to look at the novels assigned to us as high school students as monuments or mist, to be worshiped or abandoned as we did our outfit to the junior prom. That either/or narrative matches both how we encounter these “great books” in education (as non-negotiable requirements) and an educator’s hope for our response (that their “greatness” changes our lives). That may be a whole lot no-shades-of-gray thinking on my part. As proof, I’ll accept a “meh” opinion on Moby-Dick or The Scarlet Letter from anyone assigned to write an essay on it as a teenager.

Is there a third way? Read More…

Bookish, the Publishing Industry’s Great Digital Hope, Has Finally Launched

At long last, the publishing industry’s much-delayed book discovery platform has finally arrived. Bookish, a collaboration between Simon & Schuster, Hachette and Penguin, went live yesterday.

And just what has a year and a half of work produced? The home page spotlights bestsellers and new releases, alongside exclusive content like an essay from Eat Pray Love author Elizabeth Gilbert tut-tutting Philip Roth. There’s the option of receiving updates via newsletter. Browsers can also purchase, let’s say, Michael Bolton’s new memoir directly through the site.

It’s pretty clear the point of all this hullabaloo is to wrest some control away from Amazon.

Read More (Observer.com)

Bookish.com

The Publishing Industry Isn’t Doomed: Readers’ Control In The Future Of Reading

By: BARATUNDE THURSTON

The publishing industry thinks it’s the end of days, but the world of words is a growth market.

I loved that the original Kindle let me annotate a book. Being able to add and search for my own thoughts amid the previously locked words of others without physically damaging the original opened up a world of possibilities.

What if you could download books that had been pre-annotated? I would pay extra to read Freakonomics with commentary by Paul Krugman, The New Jim Crow with notes from editors at The Nation, or the Bible annotated by the creators of South Park. A book could always inspire new layers of meaning, but now it can host that inspiration and a slew of associated conversations.

Read More (FAST Company)